Mojo.  2014

Seven New-Generation African Poets. 2014

Seven New-Generation African Poets. 2014

The Seven New-Generation African Poets

The chapbook 8 box collection contains:
• Mandible by TJ Dema
• The Cartographer of Water by Clifton Gachagua
• Carnaval by Tsitsi Jaji
• The Second Republic by Nick Makoha
• Ordinary Heaven by Ladan Osman
• Our Men Do Not Belong To Us by Wasan Shire
• Otherwise Everything Goes On by Len Verwey

 Slapering Hol Press; Box edition (April 15, 2014)

This eight-piece boxed set features the work of seven African poets, with an introduction by Kwame Dawes, APBF series editor, and Chris Abani.The name, Mojo, establishes the naming convention for the series, based in the Swahili numbering system.

The Chapbooks


 

Seven New-Generations African Poets: An Introduction in Two Movements

The Introduction in Two Movements

Edited by Kwame Dawes and Chris Abani

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Second Republic

The Second Republic

THE SECOND REPUBLIC

NICK MAKOHA

“The story, at least the one that Nick is telling, is a story of what men do to each other and to women and children in the name of nationalism, freedom, and liberation. The speaker stands at a distance and observes in a cool, deadpan tone the horrors of dead bodies on the street, men hung by the genitals with barbed wire, and other such atrocities in the name of liberation. And it is in this world that the complicity of the one fleeing is expressed in the very personal trauma of the exiled.”—Kwame Dawes, APBF Series Editor, Glenna Luschei Editor of Prairie Schooner (edit)

The Cartography of a Writer

The Cartography of a Writer

THE CARTOGRAPHER OF WATER

CLIFTON GACHAGUA

“There is in Clifton’s musicality the fleetness of strings, a mark of East Africa, distinct from the drumbeat throb of the West African line. There is also the presence of the Indian Ocean to the other side. The press of a land that is open savanna that seems to sprawl into the sea allows Clifton to make musical and narrative moves like this…from ‘In Remembrance of Elsa Okello’: “The evolution of nova, the gradual shift into an idea we call destiny.” That is the kind of line you would hear from a poet like Awonoor or, dare I say, even Walcott.”—Chris Abani, Nigerian poet and novelist, PEN Award and Guggenheim winner (edit)

Our Men Do Not Belong to Us

Our Men Do Not Belong to Us

OUR MEN DO NOT BELONG TO US

WARSAN SHIRE

“Warsan’s poetry does its own thing; it is entirely her own voice—unflinching and sometimes shocking yet also exquisitely beautiful, stunningly imaginative, imagistic, memorable, always deeply felt and eminently rereadable. She challenges us to consider andreconsider the lives of women usually spoken about but not heard. The past, the present, the lyrical, and the anecdotal, hers is a name to watch as she inscribes herself into the future.”— Bernardine Evaristo, award-winning British poet and writer (edit)

Len Verwey

Len Verwey

OTHERWISE EVERYTHING GOES ON

LEN VERWEY

“The poems in Otherwise Everything Goes On convey a contemporary Africa that is surprising, wounded, and beautiful. The collection maps a long journey along the coasts of the continent, places of encounter and abandonment, and a return to them in dreams, in memories, in the things that cannot be left behind…. The true beauty of Otherwise Everything Goes On is this juxtaposition of the interior shifts of its speakers and the ‘bigger picture’ that contains and haunts them. Africa’s poets must be historians, too.”—Gabeba Baderoon, Professor of Women’s Studies and African-American Studies at Penn State University (edit)

Mandible

Mandible

MANDIBLE

TJ DEMA

“The poems collected here gently trace the arch of the mandible, following the nuances of its curves, studying its power as a vehicle for language. Like the jawbone unhinged, Dema’s poems speak with a loose and ancient understanding, all the while working to find their counterpart, searching for the other half to compliment, to create a voice that can someday speak in one accord. And perhaps this is the most memorable element of Dema’s poetry—its ability to be inviting, to allow readers a way to hinge their mandible to her own.”—Matthew Shenoda, Egyptian-American poet, writer, and professor (edit)

CARNAVAL

CARNAVAL

CARNAVAL

TSITI JAJI

“Poetry should lend itself to appreciation in isolation from the intertextual connections and cultural references. It should create a world that the reader can trust and get lost in. It must hold language captive and make it to its bidding. Jaji’s work demonstrates these abilities in abundance. Her poems, while clothed in English, bristle with the muscle of another tongue. There is an undercurrent of music that is more than poetry’s flexed musicality, and they possess the kind of regard that unsettles the eye and stills the heart.”—Nii Ayikwei Parkes, Ghanaian poet, writer, and social commentator. (edit)

Ordinary Heaven

Ordinary Heaven

AN ORDINARY HEAVEN

LADAN OSMAN

“It occurs to me that Ladan Osman is one of the most inquisitive poets I have ever read. And inquisitive is perhaps too weak a word, so let me use questioning. Her work is questioning. She asks about everything; she wants to know about everything. The rooms of these poems are crowded with all manner of things and people she wants to ask about. She picks up an image from one side of a room and asks us about it. Then she snatches another from the other side and asks about that. She is almost out of breath from so much asking. Why do you do that? Why do you do that to me?”—Ted Kooser, former US Poet Laureate (edit)

African Poetry Book Fund


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